Cooking with PubMed:

A Honey, Extra Virgin Olive Oil Citrus Nut Torte

September 12, 2013

Jacob Schor ND, FABNO

www.DenverNaturopathic.com

 

 

Some people would say I spend too much time on PubMed, the search engine of the NIH’s National Library of Medicine.  I beg to differ, as without PubMed, how would a person be able to decide what to make for dessert?

 

 

Below is a recipe for a fruit nut torte adapted from a Mark Bittman recipe in the New York Times.  With references:

 

Almond Orange Honey cake recipe

 

1 small-to-medium orange:

1 lemon

Place the orange and the lemon in a saucepan, and cover with water. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat; then reduce the heat and simmer for 30 minutes. Drain and cool. 

Once upon a time the excitement about citrus fruit was that they contained vitamin C, that anti-scurvy vitamin, but that’s a bit old fashioned.  These days the interest in citrus fruit is as much about what is in the peel as the fruit itself.  The outer peel, the stuff one might call zest contains d-limonene, a chemical that is being used to treat reflux disease, [1]   cancer,[2]   gastritis, [3]  intestinal parasites [4]  and whiten the teeth of smokers.[5]    We might add that the peels of these fruits also contain citrus pectin and mention the multiple uses that the product Pectasol is being put to use for.  In our practice our main use is to reduce risk of cancer metastasis.[6]    Doing so though would trigger a letter from our dear friend Issac Eliaz one of the co-authors of the paper just cited, who would point out that the pectin in Pectaol has been carefully modified by means more complex than boiling.  Being the consummate salesperson that he is, he would also ask us to mention the potential this product has in treating cardiovascular disease.

 

 

6 ounces raw nuts. 

Bake almonds 10 to 15 minutes in a preheated 325 degree oven.  Walnuts cook much faster, check them after five minutes. Set aside to cool. When the nuts are cool, pulse them in a food processor until ground. 

 

Once the nuts are toasted turn up the oven to 350 degrees, and grease a 9-inch springform pan.

 

 

Bittman’s recipe calls for almonds and they make a dandy tasting cake. I’ve started using walnuts instead based on the research published lately.  Walnut consumption is associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes in women. [7]   The current issue of the Natural Medicine Journal contains a commentary that I co-authored with Dr Mona Morstein [8]  on research that suggests eating walnuts is associated with longer life-span.[9]   Other recent studies using data from the PREDIMED nut and olive oil study in Spain, report that nuts reduce risk of cardiovascular disease, and walnuts in particular slow cognitive decline.  For cancer patients it is worth noting that, “Walnut consumption protects rats against cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity.” [10]  Whether they do the same for people isn’t known but they probably won’t hurt.

 

Costco is now selling almond flour made from blanched almonds.  I have used this product for this recipe but my preference is to actually toast almonds myself, with their skins on, and then grind them in a food processor.  Some researchers suggest that the benefit from nuts comes from the skin.

 

1 cup all-purpose flour

1 tablespoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon salt

 

In a decent sized bowl, whisk the flour, salt and baking powder together.  You want a bowl big enough to mix all of the cake batter together in.  I know some of our readers will look askance to using flour for all sorts of reason, many of them are valid.  If you don’t want to use flour, then don’t; add an extra cup of ground nuts and cross your fingers.  I’ve thought about substituting cocoa powder for some of the flour but haven’t tried to yet.  I’ve been adding ground flax seeds to the flour.  Breast and prostate cancer patients should try to add as much flax meal to the flour as they can stand.  Pure flax meal, used instead of flour, will make a cake that the patient’s family may not appreciate.  Half flour, half flax meal is tolerable.  A study from last April tells us that the enterolactones in flaxseed are inversely associated with prostate cancer. [11]  The classic 2009 study told us that men, who ate flax seed between prostate biopsy and surgery, reduced tumor proliferation. [12]   Another interesting study from this year reports that flaxseed interacts with the anti-breast cancer cell Herceptin so as to have a greater effect against breast tumor cells. [13]   flax seed may protect the lungs from damage during radiation therapy, especially for lung cancer.    So if you are undergoing radiation therapy, add the flax seeds.

 

 

When the citrus is cool, cut the lemon in half, and discard the pulp and seeds. Really do this as the lemon pulp tastes bitter after cooking.  Cut the orange in half, and discard any seeds. Put the fruits in the food processor and process almost to a paste.

 

With the food processor running add in one at a time:

 

 

4 eggs

 

Then slowly, very slowly in a thin stream, pour in 2/3 cup of oil. 

 

Bittman’s recipe calls for extra virgin olive oil and this is my first choice.  Recall the PREDIMED data suggested that just switching from regular olive oil to extra virgin olive oil reduces risk of heart attack and stroke by almost a third in high-risk patients.   Olive oil also seems to work synergistically with Herceptin. [15]  As Herceptin is associated with heart damage, perhaps the olive oil will protect the heart.

 

Breast cancer patients might consider using half flax seed oil.  Flax oil has been reported to hinder the growth of triple negative breast cancer.  Flax oil also has a desirable impact on HER-2 positive breast tumor cells, so it’s a coin toss over which oil might be better. 

 

At this point you’ve created a citrus tasting mayonnaise.  Now to sweeten the cake.  Bittman uses 1.5 cups of sugar.  Don’t do this: there isn’t anything good for you about sugar.

 

On the other hand there are no end of good things we might say about honey.  Perhaps the most astounding study in the last year was that giving daily rations of honey to type 1 diabetics actually seemed to help control their disease.    So while we have our cancer patients avoiding sugar and simple carbohydrates, this study perhaps gives at least a weak rationale to ignore these cautions when it comes to honey, at least in this recipe.

 

Pour the honey into the running processor in a slow stream, just the way you added the oil. How much honey?  The rough equivalent in calories is about half a cup honey to a cup of sugar.  For this recipe, say ½ to 2/3 a cup of honey should do.

 

At this point you might want to add some flavoring agents, for example vanilla, almond flavoring, amaretto or orange liquors. 

 

Empty the glop from the processor into the bowl with the flour and nuts and gently fold the ingredients together.  Turn the batter into the pan and bake for about an hour. 

 

You’ll probably want all the ingredients listed in one place.  I know looking back at this recipe I’m annoyed with myself for not doing so originally:

 

1 orange

1 lemon

 boiled and cooled

6 ounces nuts, preferably almonds, roasted and ground. 

4 eggs

¾ cup extra virgin olive oil

½ to 2/3 cup honey

flavors (vanilla, or amaretto or orange liquor)

1 cup all-purpose flour (or one additional cup of nut flour or a mixture of almond and rice flours)

1 tablespoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon salt

 

This “recipe” was originally written in September of 2013.  We’ve written a few updates worth noting since then.  Below are links to articles on nuts, honey and olive oil published in the Natural Medicine Journal over the past two years:

 

 

Consuming nuts and olive oil along with a Mediterranean Style diet is associated with a decreased risk of cognitive decline:

http://naturalmedicinejournal.com/journal/2013-11/nuts-and-extra-virgin-olive-oil-improve-cognition-and-lower-risk-stroke

 

Consuming extra virgin olive oil is associated with reduced risk of Atrial Fibrillation:

http://naturalmedicinejournal.com/journal/2015-03/extra-virgin-olive-oil-reduces-atrial-fibrillation-risk

 

Is it nuts and olive oil, or is it the Mediterranean diet that cut risk of heart disease and stroke by 30% in the PREDIMED Trial?

http://naturalmedicinejournal.com/journal/2015-03/extra-virgin-olive-oil-reduces-atrial-fibrillation-risk

 

Eating fried food is good for your heart, at least in Spain where food is fried in olive oil:

http://naturalmedicinejournal.com/journal/2012-05/fried-foods-and-heart-disease

 

Data from the PREDIMED trial continues to inform us on the benefits of diet, nuts and olive oil:

http://naturalmedicinejournal.com/journal/2015-02/prevenci%C3%B3n-con-dieta-mediterr%C3%A1nea-cohort-2-years-later

 

When it comes to health, peanuts are nuts: http://naturalmedicinejournal.com/journal/2015-05/heart-health-benefits-peanuts

 

Eating walnuts and longer life! http://naturalmedicinejournal.com/journal/2013-09/eating-walnuts-extends-longevity

 

The famous Iranian Nescafe and Honey study for persistent cough:

http://naturalmedicinejournal.com/journal/2014-07/honey-and-coffee-better-oral-steroids-persistent-cough

 

 

 

 

 

References:

 

1. Patrick L. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD): a review of conventional and alternative treatments. Altern Med Rev. 2011 Jun;16(2):116-33. Review.

PMID: 21649454 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] Free Article: http://www.altmedrev.com/publications/16/2/116.pdf

 

 

 2.  Vigushin DM, Poon GK, Boddy A, English J, Halbert GW, Pagonis C, Jarman M, Coombes RC. Phase I and pharmacokinetic study of D-limonene in patients with advanced cancer. Cancer Research Campaign Phase I/II Clinical Trials Committee.

Cancer Chemother Pharmacol. 1998;42(2):111-7.

PMID: 9654110

 

3.  Moraes TM, Kushima H, Moleiro FC, Santos RC, Rocha LR, Marques MO, Vilegas W, Hiruma-Lima CA. Effects of limonene and essential oil from Citrus aurantium on gastric mucosa: role of prostaglandins and gastric mucus secretion. Chem Biol Interact. 2009 Aug 14;180(3):499-505. doi: 10.1016/j.cbi.2009.04.006. Epub 2009 May 3.

 

4.  Abdelqader A, Qarallah B, Al-Ramamneh D, Da? G.

Anthelmintic effects of citrus peels ethanolic extracts against Ascaridia galli.

Vet Parasitol. 2012 Aug 13;188(1-2):78-84.

 

5.  Effect of toothpaste containing d-limonene on natural extrinsic smoking stain: a 4-week clinical trial.

Xie P, Lu J, Wan H, Hao Y.

Am J Dent. 2010 Aug;23(4):196-200.

 

6. Epub 2012 Apr 24.

Synergistic and additive effects of modified citrus pectin with two polybotanical compounds, in the suppression of invasive behavior of human breast and prostate cancer cells.

Jiang J, Eliaz I, Sliva D.

 

 7.  Pan A, Sun Q, Manson JE, Willett WC, Hu FB.  Walnut consumption is associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes in women. J Nutr. 2013 Apr;143(4):512-8

 

8. http://www.naturalmedicinejournal.com/article_content.asp?edition=1&section=3&article=454

 

 9.  Frequency of nut consumption and mortality risk in the PREDIMED nutrition intervention trial.

Guasch-Ferré M, Bulló M, Martínez-González MÁ, Ros E, Corella D, Estruch R, Fitó M, Arós F, Wärnberg J, Fiol M, Lapetra J, Vinyoles E, Lamuela-Raventós RM, Serra-Majem L, Pintó X, Ruiz-Gutiérrez V, Basora J, Salas-Salvadó J; PREDIMED studygroup. BMC Med. 2013 Jul 16;11:164.

 

10. Shabani M, Nazeri M, Parsania S, Razavinasab M, Zangiabadi N, Esmaeilpour K, Abareghi F. Neurotoxicology. 2012 Oct;33(5):1314-21Walnut consumption protects rats against cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity.

 

11.  Flaxseed-derived enterolactone is inversely associated with tumor cell proliferation in men with localized prostate cancer.

Azrad M, Vollmer RT, Madden J, Dewhirst M, Polascik TJ, Snyder DC, Ruffin MT, Moul JW, Brenner DE, Demark-Wahnefried W.

J Med Food. 2013 Apr;16(4):357-60.

 

12.  Flaxseed supplementation (not dietary fat restriction) reduces prostate cancer proliferation rates in men presurgery.

Demark-Wahnefried W, Polascik TJ, George SL, Switzer BR, Madden JF, Ruffin MT 4th, Snyder DC, Owzar K, Hars V, Albala DM, Walther PJ, Robertson CN, Moul JW, Dunn BK, Brenner D, Minasian L, Stella P, Vollmer RT.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 Dec;17(12):3577-87.

 

13.  Dietary flaxseed-trastuzumab interactive effects on the growth of HER2-overexpressing human breast tumors (BT-474).

Mason JK, Fu MH, Chen J, Yu Z, Thompson LU.

Nutr Cancer. 2013;65(3):451-9

 

 14. Radioprotective role in lung of the flaxseed lignan complex enriched in the phenolic secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG).

Christofidou-Solomidou M, Tyagi S, Pietrofesa R, Dukes F, Arguiri E, Turowski J, Grieshaber PA, Solomides CC, Cengel KA.

Radiat Res. 2012 Dec;178(6):568-80.

 

 15. Olive oil's bitter principle reverses acquired autoresistance to trastuzumab (Herceptin) in HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells.

Menendez JA, Vazquez-Martin A, Colomer R, Brunet J, Carrasco-Pancorbo A, Garcia-Villalba R, Fernandez-Gutierrez A, Segura-Carretero A.

BMC Cancer. 2007 May 9;7:80.

 

 16. Metabolic effects of honey in type 1 diabetes mellitus: a randomized crossover pilot study.

Abdulrhman MM, El-Hefnawy MH, Aly RH, Shatla RH, Mamdouh RM, Mahmoud DM, Mohamed WS.

J Med Food. 2013 Jan;16(1):66-72