DNC News

 


DNC News: Strontium update

 

Subject: New study confirms effect of strontium in treating osteoporosis

 

 

As some of you noticed and commented on by the shortness of my last Vitamin D article, the subject is getting old. I've reached the enough already point in reviewing these articles.

 

So it is a pleasurable distraction to find this article published a few weeks ago in Osteoporosis International. It reports on the benefit of using strontium ranelate in postmenopausal osteoporosis.

 

As you may recall from prior newsletters on this subject (links to them below), the ranelate form of strontium has been the subject of several recent research studies, all showing it to be effective treatment for osteoporosis. The ranelate portion of this ‘drug' is a patented chemical, allowing the drug company that owns the patent on it to test and soon market strontium ranelate as a patented drug. At this point there is still no reason to believer that the ranelate form is more effective than the generic, non-patentable forms of strontium. We have been using strontium citrate with osteoporosis patients for a little over a year now with apparently good effect judging from the reports of ecstatic patients who are calling us with the results of new bone scans.

 

The following information is edited out of the abstract reporting the findings of the current study:

“In women with established osteoporosis there was a 41% reduction in vertebral fractures over 3 years' treatment; significant reductions were also seen after only 1 year of treatment. The beneficial effect was also seen for clinical vertebral fractures: over 3 years there was a significant reduction in new clinical vertebral; this reduction was also observed during the first year of treatment. Over the 3-year treatment period significantly fewer patients had height loss and fewer patients reported new or worsening back pain in the treated group than in the control group.”

 

Not bad.

So bottom line for treating osteoporosis:

  1. calcium and magnesium supplement:
  2. Strontium Citrate
  3. Vitamin K-2
  4. Vitamin D
  5. Multivitamin with miscellaneous bone nutrients

 

 

 

Links:

Strontium articles:

First article: http://www.denvernaturopathic.com/news/strontiumone.html

Second article: http://www.denvernaturopathic.com/news/strontiummonograph.html

Update and price drop: http://www.denvernaturopathic.com/news/strontiumpricedrop.html

 

Changing treatments for osteoporosis:

http://www.denvernaturopathic.com/news/osteoporosis.html

 

Vitamin K-2: well it looks like I need to find and post our original newsletter on this vitamin as well as write a more detailed one. Here is the recent news on K-2 on preventing liver cancer.

http://www.denvernaturopathic.com/news/VitK2HVC.html

 

 

 

Osteoporos Int. 2004 Oct 12 [Epub ahead of print]

Prevention of vertebral fractures by strontium ranelate in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis.

 

Compston J.

 

Department of Medicine, Box 157 , Addenbrooke's Hospital, Hills Road , CB2 2QQ , Cambridge , UK .

 

The antifracture efficacy of strontium ranelate, a compound with a novel mechanism of action on bone, has been assessed in two large, randomized, controlled trials conducted in postmenopausal women. Strontium ranelate was given at a daily dose of 2 g, and all women received calcium and vitamin D supplements. In women with established osteoporosis there was a 41% reduction in vertebral fractures over 3 years' treatment [relative risk (RR) 0.59; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.48-0.73; P<0.001]; significant reductions were also seen after only 1 year of treatment. The beneficial effect was also seen for clinical vertebral fractures: over 3 years there was a significant reduction in new clinical vertebral fractures (RR 0.62; 95% CI 0.47-0.83; P<0.001); this reduction was also observed during the first year of treatment (RR 0.48; 95% CI 0.29-0.80; P=0.003). Over the 3-year treatment period significantly fewer patients had height loss and fewer patients reported new or worsening back pain in the treated group than in the control group. These results demonstrate that strontium ranelate is a new therapeutic option in the prevention of osteoporotic vertebral fractures in postmenopausal women.

 

PMID: 15480571 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

 

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